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Swim meet canceled after FINA's threat to ban athletes

GENEVA -- Amid growing conflict between swimmers and their world governing body, an international swimming meet was canceled on Thursday after threats to ban athletes who took part seeking better prize money.

The Italian swim federation called off the Dec. 20-21 competition it was organizing in Turin, saying it acted to protect athletes from FINA.

The Turin meet was linked to a proposed International Swimming League, a privately run operation that aims to operate outside of FINA's control and pay higher prize money.

"FINA declared the event 'non-approved,' threatening sanctions against the participating athletes," Italian officials said in a statement.

FINA, based in Lausanne, Switzerland, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Some Olympic champions have long criticized FINA, believing swimmers should be better rewarded, have more say in decisions and could create their own union.

Olympic champion Adam Peaty of Britain wrote on Thursday on Twitter that he was "incredibly disappointed" by the cancellation.

The politics involved will "galvanize swimmers, not break them," wrote Peaty, who holds the world records in men's 50-meter and 100-meter breaststroke.

Peaty has previously supported Hungarian star Katinka Hosszu in her public criticism of FINA and calls to create a swimmers' union.

Italian organizers said Peaty, Hosszu and other Olympic champions, including Chad Le Clos of South Africa and Sarah Sjostrom of Sweden, were due to take part in their 25-meter pool event. It was scheduled days after the short-course world championships being staged in Hangzhou, China.

The clash of events seemed to provoke FINA into finding more prize money for its worlds event in the smaller pool.

On Nov. 6, FINA added to its promised prize fund for China by almost doubling the total to $2.07 million.

FINA wrote to member federations on Oct. 30 warning of bans of up to two years for taking part in Turin.

However, a European Commission decision last year suggests swimmers could successfully challenge any attempt to limit their right to race and earn money.

The European Union's executive arm ruled the International Skating Union in breach of antitrust laws by threatening severe bans for speedskaters who wanted to compete in a South Korean-organized event in Dubai.

The ISU's threats "also serve to protect its own commercial interests," the European officials said.