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Oklahoma State Cowboys president Kayse Shrum blasts Oklahoma Sooners in statement

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Greeny: 'The Big 12 is over; it just doesn't know it yet' (1:53)

Mike Greenberg reacts to Texas and Oklahoma announcing they won't renew their Big 12 media rights. (1:53)

Oklahoma State president Kayse Shrum said Monday that Oklahoma's intentions to explore leaving the Big 12 are "the result of months of planning with the SEC" and a "clear breach" of the conference bylaws.

Shrum made the comments in a statement and in a series of tweets. In the statement, she called Oklahoma's actions "strategic" and "deliberate."

"It is difficult to understand how an Oklahoma institution of higher education would follow the University of Texas to the detriment of the State of Oklahoma," added Shrum, who took over as president on July 1.

The breach claim is in reference to Section 3.2 of the Big 12's bylaws, which references third parties attempting to induce a member institution to leave. It requires schools to inform the conference no later than 12 hours afterward, and to "immediately and unconditionally reject that offer in a form and manner reasonably acceptable to the Commissioner."

Earlier Monday, Oklahoma and Texas said in a joint statement released by both schools that they officially notified the Big 12 they will not be renewing their grants of media rights after their expiration in 2025.

Big 12 sources told ESPN on Monday that the statement leaves some "wiggle room" and doesn't fully guarantee that the flagship schools would remain in the league through 2025. The possibility remains that they will pay the $75 million to $80 million penalty for leaving early, while also giving the required 18 months' notice, per Big 12 bylaws. Some have speculated that this is the first legal maneuver, and the possibility also exists that if the Big 12 dissolves before 2025, OU and Texas would no longer be bound to stay through the duration of the contract.

The next step would be for Oklahoma and Texas to formally let the SEC know they want to join the conference. Then the SEC would need 11 of its 14 presidents and chancellors to agree to extend an invitation to the two schools.

Shrum said that OSU believes that Oklahoma's announcement on Monday is the result of ongoing discussions.

"These conversations, which developed over a long period, are a clear breach of the Big 12 Conference bylaws and broke the decades-long bond of trust between our universities," she said in the statement.

Shrum also tweeted that she has "received countless phone calls, texts and emails from high-ranking officials and members of the Cowboy family showing their support for OSU as we navigate the road ahead. Regardless of what comes next, OSU is dedicated to the State of Oklahoma."

Meanwhile, the board of regents for Texas A&M, whose officials have expressed concerns about Texas joining the Aggies in the SEC, met via conference call on Monday "for discussion and possible action on contractual and governance issues relating to Texas A&M University and the Southeastern Conference." The board remained in executive session for about 90 minutes and did not make any public statements.

The board scheduled another meeting for Wednesday at 5 p.m. ET with the same agenda language. A spokesman said Monday's meeting was informational for regents and that Wednesday's meeting would be conducted in person in College Station.

However, Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick said in a tweet that he has asked State Sen. Jane Nelson to chair a new Select Committee on the Future of College Sports in Texas, "to study the athletic & economic impact to TX schools & communities by UT's exit."

Patrick said a hearing will be held Aug. 2.

ESPN's Heather Dinich contributed to this report.